Bolivar Pets - Owners: Jeff and Mary Qualls
Birds
 
 
 
 
Canary (Serinus canarius)
Canary (Serinus canarius)
Canaries are charming pets that don't require much interaction with their owners. Canaries are often kept in pairs. While many people think of the sweetly singing yellow canary as the typical one, it is by no means the sole representative. One thing to remember is that canaries do need grit added to their diet, since they can't digest their seed otherwise. Canaries are divided into three groups: color, type and song. Type canaries often sing and song canaries are quite pretty, it's just a matter of what dominant trait was the bird bred for.

Color canaries include New color and red factors. Some red factors are fed a food additive called canthaxanthin that helps keep the red vibrant.

Type canaries are bred to have a certain "look." Common ones include the Gloster, with its Beatles-style haircut; the elongated Belgian fancy; and the frilly look of the appropriately named frills, which include Parisians, Padovans and the Gibber Italicus.

Song canaries include rollers, waterslagers and American singers. Some song canaries sing as part of a group, while others sing individually.
Parakeet
Parakeet
Cockatiels are intelligent, social, companion birds. They are the second most popular pet bird after the parakeet. These elegant looking exotic birds are known for their pumpkin orange cheek patches, bright yellow crests and long sleek tails. Ranging in colors of yellow, gray, and white, cockatiels provide us with companionship, affection and entertainment. By tending to their needs, these charming birds greet us with songs or words when we awaken each morning and amuse us with their antics all day long.

The average lifespan of a pet cockatiel is 15-20 years, but can be as short as 5-6. years with improper nutrition. They need to be talked to, played with and touched. They will solicit attention from people by singing or doing tricks. As sociable flocking birds, they like to eat while the family or anyone else is eating. Because of their ability to mimic sounds, they can be taught to talk and whistle tunes. Their talking is more unclear and muffled than the larger parrots. Both male and females are capable of learning to talk and sing, but males are more vocal.
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